Ok lets see if anyone can solve this
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Thread: Ok lets see if anyone can solve this

  1. #1
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    Ok lets see if anyone can solve this

    Ok this might be a bit lengthy but I have been stumped for almost two years with this method. I have been meeting up with one of my former painting teachers and learning about his super fast method of using turpenoid with colored pencils. I have attached one of his works since I have questions on it.
    This piece I attached of his was done on stonehenge paper with turp, and prismacolors. Some pure gesso was used for highlights in the hair. Now this is what he told me. He used a dark green in order to create his underpainting. He would layer a bunch of colors on top of the green then turp over them with either a blending stump, tampon, or q-tip. Now he said he over exaggerates the colors in order for them to look very rich. Now I tried painting my friend's face from a photo and I had applied a very light layer of dark green on the areas which are very light in value. Then I would add heavy layers of pink, peach, light orange etc all these hues which are light in value and are colors I see in the lightest areas of the face. However the colors would just end up being too pinkish and orangish, despite the light layer of dark green underneath these hues, which I thought is supposed to keep my color saturation in check. I mean it is better than layering on top of a white surface which really makes your colors saturated. I kept turping and reapplying those colors but the more I reapplied, the less I could see the underpainting and the more warmer the light values got in temperature. This leads me to my first question:

    Look at his attachement and tell me how do I make my colors nice and rich without them being over saturated? Turping over colored pencil only works if the layers are nice and full of color. Thin layers do not work as well.


    Now I asked him how am i supposed to lighten areas in value after I came up with my local color and how should I do detail work such as subtle changes is value, wrinkles, etc. He said he would use white and heavy pressure to carve out light areas. He did a demo for me and after he applied the white he would take a little turp and blend out the white. But to me it just didnt look right. You cant just put a layer of white over a color in order to create areas of light value. It looks like a nasty white film has formed over the surface. He said it is ok since the colored pencils are translucent and all those rich layers underneath should enhance the white, but I just dont see it. It looks like crap. Light areas have color to them. They are not just white. Plus white cools the temperature of any color. Please look at the attachment and tell me how the hell he possibly does this...... I tried going back and reapplying some light layers of color to the heavy pasty layer of white but it still looks awful. and the hazy, pasty white color still dominates.

    If anyone can help me out with this it would be great. I learned so much about hue, chroma, value, transparency, etc.....but I cant pull it off in my work with these friggin colored pencils.

    -Andy

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  2. #2
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    So you can ask the actual guy who did it, but instead you're asking us? I don't follow.

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  3. #3
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    I have not ever worked like this, but here are my thoughts. (Be sure to add salt.)

    Perhaps this method looks better in reproduction than in its physical form. It might be that you are closer to his results than you think. Did you get to see any of his finished pieces in person, or have you only seen them in reproduction?

    In working with caran dache, which are essentially crayons for grown-ups, I found that the most vivid colors could be achieved by layering lots and lots of ridiculous, unplanned colors with white. Im talking hot pink, blue, green, orange, yellow, whatever picked out of the box at random all of it thrown together one scribble on top of another, and in enough layers over time you get perfect, vivid skin-tones. However, I also found that mushing those colors together with turps turned that vivid optical mix into mud more often than not. Perhaps you are relying too much on a formula.

    I think you are awesome, and I wish you the best in your endeavors, but I am tired of repeating myself, I am very busy with my new baby, and I am no longer a regular participant here, so please do not contact me to ask for advice on your career or education. All of the advice that I have to offer can already be found in the following links. Thank you.

    Perspective 101, Concept Art 101, Games Industry info,Oil Paint info, Acrylic Paint info, my sketchbook.
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