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  1. #1
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    Need some advice..

    Just wondering something,I have a board game project underway involving plastic pieces and whatnot. My question is what can I carve them out of that will hold up in a mold,ie what can I make the mold out of?


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  3. #2
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    i dont actually have an answer, but i bet if you search the forums or the internet you can find one! haha sorry i catn be of more help, but i am sure if you just search you can find it! good luck

  4. #3
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    Traditionally (prior to around 1970), miniatures were typically sculpted out of wax, or carved from solder. Since then, epoxy putties have become the primary media for miniatures because it can withstand the heat and pressure of vulcanization. There are many putties on the market, but the two that seem to be the most popular as a primary sculpting putty are Kneadatite Blue/Yellow (aka "Green Stuff"), and a relatively new putty called ProCreate. These are both somewhat "flexible" putties that have a little give after they are fully cured, making them more likely to survive the mold-making process.

    Most sculptors also use at least one other putty - usually a hard putty like Kneadatite Brown/Aluminum (aka "Brown Stuff"), Milliput, Tamiya) because they tend to be better suited for making weapons and items with sharp edges, because they can be sanded and filed after they are cured.

    There is a sizable minority of miniature sculptors who also work in polymer clay (like Sculpey or Fimo), although these sculptors typically have to make an intermediate mold out of RTV silicone, and then cast in a harder material to create a master for the moldmaking process, as polymer clay will not withstand the heat or pressure of vulcanization.

    For injection-molded plastic, most work is now done from computer masters, although you can still have it done from a physical sculpture. Are you aware of the set-up costs involved with injection-molded plastic? You should investigate that before you get too set on that method. While the per-unit cost of injection-molded plastic pieces is very low, you're generally looking at a minimum of $15k for machining each mold, and a minimum order in the tens of thousands. It may be that new technology has lowered this, but I think it's still generally the case that plastic is expensive unless you're doing a large run. You might find that rotary-cast white metal or resin might be a more cost-effective solution for your first print run, unless you have distribution agreements set-up with a national distributor.

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