How important is tablet work professionally?
 
View testimonialsView Artwork
Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    1,774
    Thanks
    768
    Thanked 769 Times in 340 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    How important is tablet work professionally?

    ...if, that is, I ever choose art as a profession.

    I ask because for me, it's very hard to do tablet work not because of the tablet itself, but because my eyes are more sensitive to light than the average person and I have trouble staring at a screen for too long. When it comes to paper and pencil, I have no problems at all, but when I use my tablet and start getting into detail work, my eyes trip out on me and I can't look at the screen for a few minutes. My resistance begins to weaken as I return to the screen more often.

    So I ask: with this massive influx of technological improvement, how essential is it to learn how to use a tablet?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    223
    Thanks
    28
    Thanked 12 Times in 9 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Only if you don't like using a mouse...

    I find sketching, outlining with marker so the scanner can't funk up the sketch, and then using that image in Photoshop is just as effective as starting a line drawing on a tablet. You just use a little more paper instead of a little more electricity. Using a mouse as a drawing tool obviously takes a little practive but not much...

    Up to your preference really. There are some who will swear by tablets but I never really found the use for them outside of doodling in my Pocket PC, which is kind of tablet-like; using a stylus and all.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    57
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Big Zam it strikes me that the issue (as you acknowledge in your post) is not the use of a tablet but, because of your light sensitivity and difficulty with screens, but with a digital medium on the whole. Am I right?

    Is this an issue or hinderance to an individual who wants to become an artist? Well, obviously as art continues to evolve and change around the techonology that surrounds it the digital medium is becoming more and more central to the creation of art (especially within the commercial side of things). On the other side, all the traditional methods and tools which have existed for hundreds of years will continue to exist and I am certain that some artists (whether by choice or due to conditions such as your own) will continue to depend and strive within these realms rather than that of the digital arena.

    Last edited by Nathan House; November 2nd, 2007 at 06:31 AM. Reason: spelling
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    1,774
    Thanks
    768
    Thanked 769 Times in 340 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Nathan House View Post
    Big Zam it strikes me that the issue (as you acknowledge in your post) is not the use of a tablet but, because of your light sensitivity and difficulty with screens, but with a digital medium on the whole. Am I right?

    Is this an issue or hinderance to an individual who wants to become an artist? Well, obviously as art continues to evolve and change around the techonology that surrounds it the digital medium is becoming more and more central to the creation of art (especially within the commercial side of things). On the other side, all the traditional methods and tools which have existed for hundreds of years will continue to exist and I am certain that some artists (whether by choice or due to conditions such as your own) will continue to depend and strive within these realms rather than that of the digital arena.
    I'm having trouble decoding exactly what you mean in the first part of your post...lemme put it this way.

    I want to learn to use a tablet, but because my eyes are so sensitive, it makes it difficult.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    292
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 22 Times in 18 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    computer eye strain?

    do you know the 20-20-20 rule? every twenty mins, look twenty feet away and blink twenty times.

    or use visine. dry eyes make me tired, especially after long bouts of gaming.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    1,475
    Thanks
    25
    Thanked 17 Times in 16 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    This might be a dumb suggestion but is there a way to lower the brightness of your monitor?

    [][][][] DRAW EVERYDAY [][][][]>
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by BigZam View Post
    I'm having trouble decoding exactly what you mean in the first part of your post...lemme put it this way.

    I want to learn to use a tablet, but because my eyes are so sensitive, it makes it difficult.
    Hopefully what I've understood is correct, but what I think he's saying is... That the problem is not the tablet in itself, but a problem with your eye sensitivity / monitor, etc.

    Does usage of the computer as a digital medium with a mouse affect you the same way?

    Then you're asking the wrong question.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Mack View Post
    This might be a dumb suggestion but is there a way to lower the brightness of your monitor?
    yeah, with LCDs which are the most common computer display at the moment you can lower the brightness but unfortunately doing so will also reduce the level of contrast. Reducing the brightness on a CRT monitor won't reduce contrast as much as doing so on a LCD, but CRTs are harsher on your eyes regardless IMO.

    If you want to maintain accurate colour you wouldn't want to lower the brightness too much.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    35
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I see no use in using a tablet if you're forced to not use it in the end...

    It can be important since it is advantageous to many illustrators who otherwise wouldn't be able to put out as much work in as little time.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    101
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I have sensitive (and bad) eye sight as well. One of the things that bugs out my eyes the lost is a low refresh rate. Any refresh rate below 75 I can actually see. So for me eye strain is an issue on a CRT.

    Conversely I can use a Good flat panel with out the same issues. Used my Brother's Very large iMac for about 4 hours and still my eyes felt fine.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    291
    Thanks
    44
    Thanked 52 Times in 22 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Do you wear corrective lenses? If so, your problem can be addressed in any number of ways.

    If you're wearing glasses: (do one of these, not all)

    -Get an anti-reflective coating on your lenses. That will cut down on glare and eye strain when looking at the computer. AR can not be put on old lenses unfortunately, due to the way that it is processed. A regular AR coating should be around a $50-$60 add on. There are some higher quality AR coatings out there like Hoya's Super HiVision but it'll run you more money.

    -If it's the actual light that you're sensitive to and not the glare then the above won't work... And you're pretty much limited to reducing the brightness of your monitor. That is not an ideal situation unfortunately (for reasons already stated)

    -Get contacts, if you can. (Once again, only if it's an eye strain thing)

    Monitors tend not to project enough light to cause eye sores to light sensitive individuals. Getting eye pains when you go out on a bright sunny day is vastly different from staring at a monitor for a couple hours at a time.

    You can always go to an eye doctor for him to examine you and identify a solution to your problem.

    Unfortunately the concept art world would be very difficult to succeed in if you're a traditional only artist. Deadlines are too stringent for that sort of thing.

    Anyway, good luck.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    1,774
    Thanks
    768
    Thanked 769 Times in 340 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Thanks for the feedback guys. I think my problem lies in actual sketching with the Wacom (which I'm terrible at anyway). I think if I use moderation I could probably color scanned drawings.

    Speaking of which, do illustrators/concept artists usually work directly by sketching with the Wacom or more with scanned sketches?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  14. #13
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    227
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I've been strugling with some light sensitivity also.
    Lower the brightness on your monitor, most monitors got really high light levels that no one can stare at(I promise this). The newer the screen , the higher the lightning is in most cases, because it's an selling argument. I've heard people go as low as 20% on brightness to be able to use their monitor.
    I have my lcd set on 50%, so you must find what works for you.
    some stuff that can irritate also is the anti-glare coating on a monitor, the "shimmering" effect.
    there's also a huge difference between monitors if you see to backlight.
    some do produce much better backlightning, more even.
    another tip, get good light conditions in your room where you have the computer, make it evenly lit and never to dark.

    and for the tablet issue.
    Practice is your friend.
    Set the options for the tablet correctly (don't forget force proportions!)
    just scribble around, try doing perfect squares, circles etc.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
The Art Department
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook