Hero Design process

Join 500,000+ artists on ConceptArt.Org.

Its' free and it takes less than 10 seconds!

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 7 of 7

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    72
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Hero Design process

    So I have a question that i would like people's take on. When design say the face of a hero. Is there things you keep in mind. Maybe things that make the character that much more interesting. I'm specifically talking about faces here.

    I figure this is the place where I can ask since everyone comes here. Thank you for your time.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Buckinghamshire, UK
    Posts
    1,759
    Thanks
    310
    Thanked 307 Times in 201 Posts
    Probably some sign of the things they have survived in the past, some depth. Some of their back-story should show in their eyes ideally.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    4,881
    Thanks
    286
    Thanked 1,439 Times in 259 Posts
    Dash, can you show some examples of characters whose story is visible in their eyes? (I’ve got to see it to believe it.)

    I think you are awesome, and I wish you the best in your endeavors, but I am tired of repeating myself, I am very busy with my new baby, and I am no longer a regular participant here, so please do not contact me to ask for advice on your career or education. All of the advice that I have to offer can already be found in the following links. Thank you.

    Perspective 101, Concept Art 101, Games Industry info,Oil Paint info, Acrylic Paint info, my sketchbook.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,888
    Thanks
    752
    Thanked 3,153 Times in 1,067 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Seedling View Post
    Dash, can you show some examples of characters whose story is visible in their eyes? (I’ve got to see it to believe it.)
    Nick Furry. How did he get that eye patch? Was it his fault? Was it an accident? Does that make him weaker now?

    See, adds depth.

    "Astronomy offers an aesthetic indulgence not duplicated in any other field. This is not an academic or hypothetical attraction and should require no apologies, for the beauty to be found in the skies has been universally appreciated for unrecorded centuries."
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    272
    Thanks
    85
    Thanked 22 Times in 10 Posts
    I know your asking about the face, but really, a face is just another avenue for application of the driving philosophy behind the design. A fairly important one, given that whole 'window to the soul' business, but an extension none the less. There are different philosophies, mostly because people have different goals.

    For instance, Matt Groening believes good character designs are the ones that are immediately recognizable in silhouette, because they're more memorable. He also wanted to grab people's attention immediately when they were flicking through the channels. As a result, our hero Bart has some pretty funky hair and neon-yellow skin.

    Peanuts characters don't stand-up to the silhouette test very well, but then again, Charles Schultz was more concerned with presenting Charlie Brown as the normal everyday man. As a result, our hero Charlie Brown was pretty banal, in comparison to the rest or just on his own.

    Disney deals in moral absolutes, and as a result wants characters to look like their role. You know exactly where Disney characters stand in the storyline the second you look at them. As a result, Scar looks evil, jagged lines, gangly skin, dark mane, piercing unnatural eyes, slinking stance, evil, evil, evil.

    The likes of Hayao Miyazaki doesn't deal in moral absolutes. The Villians in (most) Miyazaki flicks have redeeming qualities to make them seem more human. As a result, his Villians aren't designed to be overtly evil looking. Such as Yubaba in Spirited Away, whose design played both the "evil" and "good" witch sisters (and succeeded in both roles).

    Last edited by Zilant; October 22nd, 2007 at 03:12 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    72
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    This are all really good points. I should have been more specific. We're in the process of designing hero characters for one of our future games. Because of the nature of our game in which characters have to share bodies and animation cycles. The only thing that has to be unique in the game would be the head which is design for this specific character.

    I really have enjoy reading the few post that you guys have made. Thank you and if anyone else has any suggestions by all means, please post.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    671
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 29 Times in 22 Posts
    Its easier with older people then younger people, but you can tell a persons demeanor by the look of their face. What happens is depending on how often you smile or frown or squint or furrow your brow, etc. you develop wrinkles showing these particular facial expressions. So someone who had a hard life might have a sharper droopier face then someone who laughed all the time and would have big laugh lines and rounder features.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •