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    art class

    So I've just started taking an art class entitled "Intro to drawing" and I'm struggling to see the value of what she's teaching. So far we've done contour drawings, sillohette(SP?), implied line and minimal contour. All of which are valid methods but I don't see the point of these exercises, not to mention she insists we never use our drawing tool (whatever it may be) as a pencil. Instead she insists we grip in in an over-hand fashion, sort of as though you were pointing to something.

    Is this the normal way a class is done? I hope I'm not getting jerked around here.

    I think the problem with pen&ink is that there is no Ctrl+z command.

    writers and artists have a lot in common -- we both draw from life, we both paint pictures, and we'll both spend to many sleepless nights on our work.


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    Elwell's Avatar
    Elwell is offline Sticks Like Grim Death Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
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    Can she draw?


    Tristan Elwell
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    kev ferrara is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
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    These sound like standard operating proceedures to me.

    The point of teaching you to hold your drawing instrument like that is to back you away from the surface (which is good for a lot of different reasons) and give you more gestural freedom with your arm, setting you up for more freedom of expression through posture. Often us pencil folk are real up close to the page as we draw... and that can lead to some uptight habits. First order of business in art school is to break out of the bad habits.

    I wonder if your experience will be as hardcore as some I've heard. Where the teacher, in order to teach you not to be afraid of a blank piece of paper, will come around and ruin your paper as you are working on it. I always loved that idea.

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    Yup, pretty standard stuff.

    When I'm figure drawing on something bigger than 9x12 I use the overhand grip you're describing except for a few small details at the end with a regular grip. Here's a post about different pencil grips and what they're good for.

    I think the exercises you're doing are very valuable, but years of teachers putting their students through them without framing them properly or really understanding their value themselves have jaded lots of people who went through them with similar confusion to yours.

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    As dose mentioned, often good stuff is taught without any decent explanation as to what you should be learning from the exercise, which can turn a good class into a poor class. So you must keep an eye on your objectives. If your goal is ultimately to be able to draw people or environments in good composition, then you must make sure that the exercises you are doing are getting you to that goal. Even the most pointless and misdirected assignments can be used to get you where you want to be if you approach them with your eyes open.

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    always ask why.

    just try not to sound like a dick when doing it.

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    If she's not explaining to you the point of the exercises, then her teaching skills are weak. Ask her, or get her to show you more details to find out if she can offer you what you need.

    Most beginners start off with a very tight writing-style grip, so re-training them is necessary, but keep in mind that free line drawing from the arm is not the absolute method that many people preach. It's worthwhile to learn how to loosen up, but learning control and precision are equally important exercises. It depends on what it is you're drawing or trying to acheive.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    Can she draw?
    Honestly Elwell, I have no idea. She hasn't exactly "shared" any of her work with the class. I'd feel more at ease if I knew she could create landscapes that could knock socks off, but mostly I'm just glad this forums overall view of her methods are cautiously positive.

    Oh and don't worry sweet oblivion, if I do ask her what the point is, I won't be a dick about it. =p

    I will try to keep an open mind, it's just the sheer obscurity of what I was being taught coupled with dull explanations led me to question the validity of her teachings <- wow that sounded smarter than I normally am.

    I think the problem with pen&ink is that there is no Ctrl+z command.

    writers and artists have a lot in common -- we both draw from life, we both paint pictures, and we'll both spend to many sleepless nights on our work.


    My (new) sketchbook: http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=100982

    My (old) Sketchbook:http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=88773
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