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  1. #1
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    My First Creature

    hi everyone...im new to this forum and to sculpting, anyhoo i thought id show you all my first creature....i started out doing smellybugs tutorial(its great btw) but decided to do a few thing differant as id never be able to make mine look as good as his, and the fun was sort of gone because i knew what it was going to look like...if you get what i mean..i realise i've got a long ,long way to go but if anyone has any tips on painting sculptures id sure love to hear them....and sorry if it offends anyone that ive used smellybugs idea to work from...it was just to get a feel for things, the next one will be all me - for better or worse..lol
    My First Creature

    thanks for looking,
    Natty


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  3. #2
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    Hey Natty,

    I'd like to say it looks great, but if you want more then "kudos, not only did you finish, but its painted! Awesome!" Your going to have to throw up a couple closer pics from different angles, then we can see the detail and properly crit on it, eh?

    What I can see right now though is that the actual sculpting looks pretty good, and it's nicely styled. But you need to work on the presentation of the sculpt itself. That pole is a damn eyesore. If the armature was built so that the pole is coming out of that knuckled fist it wouldn't pull as much attention, and you could hide it completely unseen in a base.

    Not saying you can't ever have it coming out the bottom in the middle, that SmellyTut is a good example of it working, but his creature was also designed larger and a lot m ore streamlined, its almost an oval, so the bar doesn't get in the way of sightlines, whereas, especially from this position, I can't even see the back leg because of it really, and if you rotate it that problem is just gonna switch to another leg.

    But, don't worry about it. The vast majority of people make that mistake first time up, I did, 'cause its such a small thing, but it can be important.

    Anyway, good first go on ya, I'd like to see more.

    - 'Props

  4. #3
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    thanks for the reply...id long given up hope of ever getting one
    the base was so small and light that if the pole didnt come out the middle it would be allways falling over - but point taken and its somthing i'll keep in mind ...ill get some more pics tommorow if the light permits...its night here at the moment and i cant get decent ones.
    im doing the armature for my next sculpt atm but its not progressing...im doing a skeleton and the ribs are proving difficult but hopefully(fingers crossed..lol) ill figure it out soon .

    thanks again for your post, its appreciated

  5. #4
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    No worries, eh? I know how frustrating it is to get no replies.

    With skeletons (this advice is geared towards human skeletons but works for all) I find it's easier and substantially less frustrating to run the armature up through the spine and sculpt the vertabrae, and then bake it hard, first. After thats done and you don't need to worry about screwing up all the painstaking detail, you can add the ribs on after. Depending on the look you can make each one separate, bake them, and then attach them with something like Apoxie Sculpt (I like Apoxie Sculpt and others like it because you can sculpt detail into them, and once they harden you can bake the sculpture again if you've added Sculpey and it wont harm the Apoxie Sculpt) or just make it in two halves and hide the seam in the sternum.

    Depending on your scale copper wire should be enough to hold up the ribs as an armature.

    (I'm personally partial to making each rib separate and baking it with a heat gun, it seems like more work, but your not accidently grabbing and mucking up soft ones while working on others and etc, its just less hassle. Unless your considerably less accident prone then I am.)

    Hopefully that helped a bit.

    - 'Props.

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