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  1. #1
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    very first sketch/drawing attempt

    Okay what you're about to see is nowhere near as amazing as the work on here but I don't know where else to get advice on how to improve drawing.

    Its my very first sketch/drawing.. just downloaded a trial of painter and tested out my new tab. I'm having a hard time with the nose.. for some reason its the worst thing to draw. Any tips?

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  3. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skeedio View Post
    ... Any tips?
    Well, I think youd better hit the books bud.

    Study anatomy, proportions, perspective, and when you get that down, start with the color. til then, start a sketchbook and get to practicing.

    J.L. ALFARO


    "Be who you are and say what you feel,because those that mind don't matter and those that matter don't mind."
    -Dr. Seuss


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    Doing that.. bought a few anatomy books..
    Drawing humans is just so much harder than made up creatures.. first time to ever really try a human face and even though I read about proportions and all it just doesn't want to work. I'd like to hear some tips from people that experience the same.. how can you go from drawing cartoons to realistic things?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Skeedio View Post
    Doing that.. bought a few anatomy books..
    Good for you man, you should start a sketchbook and sketch away

    Drawing humans is just so much harder than made up creatures.. first time to ever really try a human face and even though I read about proportions and all it just doesn't want to work.
    Its not working because you need to practice it

    I'd like to hear some tips from people that experience the same.. how can you go from drawing cartoons to realistic things?
    that would be me, and at the risk of wounding retorical and like an ass(which is not my intention) -practice; its the best way to go from drawing cartoons to realistic things.

    J.L. ALFARO


    "Be who you are and say what you feel,because those that mind don't matter and those that matter don't mind."
    -Dr. Seuss


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    As for the drawing, I cant really help you much there the only way to improve on that is to look at life and see for yourself what you are doing wrong. Draw one from life and post it here, then draw 1000 more and maybe you'll get it. Its tough but that how it is.

    I hope I can help a little on the painting tho. When you are painting you have to keep in mind that your are trying to define shapes and forms. Where these forms go and why they go there will all become a second nature as you start studying anatomy. In this quick paintover I am trying to illustrate that you have to look for value and color synergy above all and that the drawing doesnt matter as much.

    very first sketch/drawing attempt

    I hope this helped a little and good luck on your art journey

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    From the drawing you've submitted, it looks like there is some fighting involved from drawing a symbol of something (the nose looks like a nose "symbol" instead of an actual nose) and constructing a head from the array of real shapes that you are seeing with your eye.

    In addition to the anatomy books, I would recommend the book "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain."

    As far as cartooning, to me, it is taking what you've de-constructed visually to create an abstracted figure, background, series of objects, whatever. So learning to look at an object without the symbols getting in the way can only help cartooning.

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    Thanks for all the tips.

    practice; its the best way to go from drawing cartoons to realistic things.
    Yeah I agree.. but practicing can become very demotivating if there's nobody around to comment on what you're doing wrong so that's the whole reason I started the thread.

    Thanks for the painting tips Ben v.. never looked at it that way before.

    One little question.. do all of you sketch on paper before working it out on the computer or do you just use the computer right away?

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    but practicing can become very demotivating if there's nobody around to comment on what you're doing wrong so that's the whole reason I started the thread.
    Thrust me, if there was a shortcut to learning how to draw I would've been the first to have told you but there just isnt. As with everything in life you have to work hard to get where you want to be. If you want to be able to draw humans realisticly you will have to study anatomy, simple as that. I really dont want to sound like an ass but there just is no easy mode when it comes to learning how to draw. Life is rough, it's the way you deal with it that defines you as a person.

    One little question.. do all of you sketch on paper before working it out on the computer or do you just use the computer right away?
    For me it really depands on the situation, I always have a sketchbook with me because I travel alot at any given day. So sometimes I scan from my sketchbook and sometimes I just start doodling digitally.

    As for you I would suggest sticking to pencil and paper for now, digital painting is a very tough subject to tackle and you dont want to make it to hard on yourself. For now just stick to your sketchbook + pencil and draw everything around you + study anatomy

    Last edited by Ben V; September 26th, 2007 at 05:52 PM.
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    If you like drawing, do it for the fun of it. If you start out thinking that you have to become good, you'll just get frustrated and give it up because in the beginning you WON'T advance fast enough...

    Do it cause it's fun and let it take its time.

    - Current project <- Crit away!
    - The Whyatt Sketchbook Any tips appreciated

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    sometimes your first thought is always right
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    This won't be as good as ben's paintover but I still wanted to make this point: one cgreat thing to learn first is planes. Basically in your drawing there's nothing coming forward and going back. Planes are the 'sections' of the object that help us think about it's form. Andrew Loomis' book "drawing the head and hands" is a great resource for facial planes, I highly sugest getting it. It the meantime, here's a little planes paintover and how it affects lighting:

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    Thanks Rhineville that was really helpful

    Thrust me, if there was a shortcut to learning how to draw I would've been the first to have told you but there just isnt. As with everything in life you have to work hard to get where you want to be. If you want to be able to draw humans realisticly you will have to study anatomy, simple as that. I really dont want to sound like an ass but there just is no easy mode when it comes to learning how to draw. Life is rough, it's the way you deal with it that defines you as a person.
    You must have misunderstood.. its not that I don't want to learn or practice things.. I know that's the only way to really master anything but I have nobody around me that knows anything about art or drawing so the only critique I can get is online.. back when I was younger I missed not having people comment the things I made and recommend different things to try so I gave up on it.. books can't point out the things you're doing wrong and that's the frustrating part for me. Anyways just found a few sketchbooks of beginners so I might start one there and hopefully learn more about it that way.

    Another question about your painting method Ben v, how do you add detail to it? Do you just erase some of the parts where detail is required or just paint over it?

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  13. #12
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    A note on learning from anatomy books. You can read them all day long and memorize where the hell the femoral bicep is and never learn a thing. If you want to get the most out of those books, draw the drawings in them. Start from the beginning of the book and draw every single drawing and picture in it. Draw them at a one to one ratio so you can measure your proportions. Once you finish the drawing analyze it and look at the one in the book, why is it different? Draw it again. and again. Like others have said drawing is key to painting. Learn to draw before you try color. Most ateliers don't start you on color until after at least a year of value drawing.

    I'm glad to hear you are not discouraged.

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    Another question about your painting method Ben v, how do you add detail to it? Do you just erase some of the parts where detail is required or just paint over it?
    As an example of explaining my painting method I did a really quick tutorial for you (it's not perfect but I am pretty tired at the moment so I hope it gets the point across).

    very first sketch/drawing attempt

    So here I used the eye as an example to show that you can relate everything back to basic shapes. As you can clearly see the eye has the basic shape of a sphere and if you would take an eyeball and put it on a table it would cast a shadow. Understanding this is very important.

    As you begin to understand that everything has volume, drawing (for example) an eye becomes very easy. Now because you understand the fact that the eyeball is a 3d shape all you need to do is wrap the eyelids around the actual sphere.

    This is basicly the ground rule to my painting method, understanding the shapes. I hope you can also see why everybody is stressing that you should study anatomy and draw before you start painting. This is so you actually understand what you are painting and why you are adding shadows where you are.

    geez... I hope I made any sense at all if not please ask for clarification

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    these guys are giving you all kinds of great advice!! if only i had this sort of thing back in the day!! you're doing well. i actually enjoy the crudeness of your strokes. it's sort of refreshing. keep that in mind, and don't try to make your art "polished", just work on being knowledgeable (sp?) anyway, do think about planes, light, shade, color (warm comes out at you and cool receeds) and form.
    think about it this way- you're not drawing the nostril hole, right? because it doesn't exist, it's a hole. what you're drawing is the three dimentional flesh AROUND the nostril. it's got height, width, and depth, and the planes are the lines separating those dimentions- just like a square box.
    probably confused you there, but the more you practice and observe, the more this stuff will make sense.

    keep drawing and keep posting!! yeah!!

    jon

    MY CPU IS A NEURO-NET PROCESSOR - A LEARNING COMPUTER.
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    As others have said that you need to learn to not draw symbols, I'll elaborate on this. What this means is don't draw an "Eye" or a "Nose," instead draw the five or so lines that form together to create an eye. People all "Know" that a perfect almond shape with a colored circle and a black circle in it is an "eye" but in reality this is not so. In reality an eye is made of many shapes, colors, shadows and highlights. In reality an eye has volume, and bulges out the eyelids. I believe someone already recommended "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain" I agree, this book helped me a TON in drawing and painting, but I'm still only fair, and I keep practicing every day to get better.

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  17. #16
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    Thanks so much for all the advice.

    The method made a lot of sense, thanks Ben v!

    I guess I should really work on the whole depth and realistic thing of face details. You guys have no idea how much this has helped me.. I'll practice drawing some eyes/noses today.

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    hey skeedio,
    i´ve also just started to draw....
    take your time....i for myself do because first i also wanted to much to fast and the fun then is left behind.
    start a sketchbook.

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