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Thread: Oil painting?

  1. #1
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    Oil painting?

    Anyone tried oil painting on a sculpture? I was thinking of trying oils, because they don't dry as fast and you could take your time and blend the colors. Unlike acrylics, which dries quite rapidly.
    I'm not sure if oils will stick well on sculpey, resin, plaster, or other surface. Maybe some kind of primer will be needed?


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  3. #2
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    ive tried oils breifly.
    i found that painting details was a pain. i think i need to play around a bit more to be sure, but i didnt like it much.
    i wasa painting on waterclay, you may need primer. do some test pieces first.
    let us know how u get on

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    I'd definitely prime the surface. For big pieces, acrylic gesso would be good. For small ones with fine detail that the gesso might clog, the gray spray primer sold for models and miniatures would work.

    Tristan Elwell
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    If your problem is the fast dry, try a "Drying Retarder". I have one from Vallejo and it works fine. Oh well, it's not like an oil paint but it works

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    I figured that oil painting might not be good for small or detailed sculptures because that stuff is thick and goopy. However, for smooth surfaces, it might work. I'll go to the art supply store and look at what's available and give it a try.

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    Will it be a long time to wait for the oil color becoming dry?

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    I've used Oil on sculpty, it worked well. but stayed a little stickey for a long time. a few weeks I think. I didnt put any primer on it, though you may want to experament with it first. I also wasnt doing any detail work.

    I had sculpted a floor texture for something to stand on, and wanted some muckey grime and blood to be on it. Acrylic Looks terrible as a 'wet' surface I think, even with a gloss spray, so I used oil. I dont know if i'd use it on a character though... May cause you some trouble. and deffinitely 2 or 3 coats, wich will take a few days.

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