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  1. #1
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    Perspective Process Thread

    Let's start a thread where those talented artists who have mastered the use of perspective can give us a glimpse of their process (be it digital or traditional).

    I don't know about everyone else, but I find that merely knowing the laws of perspective isn't enough. I either end up so muddying my work with perspective lines until it becomes unworkable or I suck the all the energy out of the final. I for one would greatly benefit by seeing how the rest of you stay sane during this right-brained side to our left-brained industry.

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  2. #2
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    2nd'ed.

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  3. #3
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    I have a ton of day job meetings right now, but I hate to see the whole community leave you guys hanging. I hope you can forgive the crudity of the drawings I have here. You can make much better drawings once you know how to show their proportions in space.

    In traditional media use something like a 4H pencil and don't push down hard enough to inscribe a channel in the paper. In digital, put these lines in a layer you can later hide.
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    This will be one point perspective this week. In step 0ne draw a horizon and then draw one vanishing point somewhere on that horizon.
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    Then you would draw a two dimensional shape that leads toward the three dimensional shape you will eventually need. (stick with me here, I hope it will become more clear).
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    Then you can draw a line from each corner of the two dimensional shape back to the vanishing point. The other corners of a three dimensional shape can be defined by those lines toward the vanishing point. They are merely guidelines to show you how things gradually seem to be smaller as they become farther from you.
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    Here is the point that you can begin to see why you are doing these shapes. Everything in the world fits inside some kind of basic shape. I am making a Toyota Scion in the box and a boat seen from underneath using the cylinder. Cylinders are, of course, great for space ships and airplanes.
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    Chairs are basically modified boxes.
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    Complex shapes, such as the front end of the Sulaco troop ship from Aliens, or a cityscape seen from great altitude can be done in one point perspective. Just erase away the lines that wouldn't be visible, including the ones that are hidden because they are behind a solid object.
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    Other very complex shapes can be made by making shapes in multiple sections, or shapes within shapes.
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  4. #4
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    I would like to see more examples. I am struggling with perspective. I have a ton of resources, yet I can't get a grasp on it. How do I incorporate the figure into a scene? How do I get the point of view that I am aiming for?

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  5. #5
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    Understood. More examples next week, including moving on to FUNdamental 2 point and three point. I'd do it now but I have to spend the next four days in So. Cal. attending mandatory continuing education classes (so I don't lose professional licenses I really need). With more time I hope to be able to make drawings that look a little more polished.

    For a slew of one point perspective environments, go to the past Environment of the Week community activity thread known as "Tunnel City" which is a topic that screams out for one point perspective.

    The tunnel city episode happened about the first week of May, 2007, so you'll have to set your "show threads" option to show the old stuff or else do a search for that thread.

    Last edited by arttorney; September 26th, 2007 at 05:25 PM.
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  6. #6
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    Hello! This thread has the potential to be a great resource. Thanks for starting it. I happen to be in the process of teaching perspective to my mentees. I can copy those assignments in here for anyone else seeking to learn.

    ******************
    [edit] I'm going to start a new thread with this stuff.

    Last edited by Seedling; October 1st, 2007 at 12:23 PM.
    I think you are awesome, and I wish you the best in your endeavors, but I am tired of repeating myself, I am very busy with my new baby, and I am no longer a regular participant here, so please do not contact me to ask for advice on your career or education. All of the advice that I have to offer can already be found in the following links. Thank you.

    Perspective 101, Concept Art 101, Games Industry info,Oil Paint info, Acrylic Paint info, my sketchbook.
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  7. #7
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    The perpective nugget

    I'm a high school art teacher, and I help students understand perspective all the time.
    Itís really very easy, once you get rid of some bad ideas.
    First, I don't use the word perspective, Ďcause it has connotations of using a ruler to make a road go into the distance.
    I say POINT of VIEW, instead of "perspective"
    The most important thing about UNDERSTANDING point of view, is not that all the receding lines go to that little dot... its realizing that YOU are the little dot.
    That dot, (called the vanishing point) moves where you move, it goes where you go. If you are up high, it goes up high on your picture plane. If you are to the left, the vanishing point goes to the left on your picture plane.
    Don't even call it a vanishing point any more... call it your "eyeball."

    From now on, wherever you get ready to start a drawing, decide where you want your POINT OF VIEW to be from, and thatís where your vanishing point goes.

    P.S all of the above is for Ď1 point liner perspective.' Which is only useful if you are inside something; like a room or tunnel or roadway, for everything else, there is 2,3,4, and even the never used 5 point linear perspective (all of which I may try to come back and explain laterÖ if Iím not too lazy.)

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  8. #8
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    Psst. . . Lanham, Iím just getting warmed up. You might be interested in checking out my concept Art 101 assignments for your class. The link is in my sig.

    I donít get to invent the names of the things Iím teaching. Iím merely passing it along.

    Iíll be right back. . .

    I think you are awesome, and I wish you the best in your endeavors, but I am tired of repeating myself, I am very busy with my new baby, and I am no longer a regular participant here, so please do not contact me to ask for advice on your career or education. All of the advice that I have to offer can already be found in the following links. Thank you.

    Perspective 101, Concept Art 101, Games Industry info,Oil Paint info, Acrylic Paint info, my sketchbook.
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  9. #9
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    Just for clarity what I'd like to see in this thread is less of the academics of perspective (there is value in that, but most of the people here already have had the acedemics) and more about the application of those academics.

    I'll post something here shortly about how I use 3D software to make very generic shapes to find perspective in my work. But I'd love to see some real world process examples from others.

    You know, hear some of the pros say "here was a perspective challenge and how I met it".

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  10. #10
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    Perhaps someone else can fill in with that. I'm posting these assignments here because I happen to already be writing them for my students, and I know there are others here who don't yet know the basics.

    I think you are awesome, and I wish you the best in your endeavors, but I am tired of repeating myself, I am very busy with my new baby, and I am no longer a regular participant here, so please do not contact me to ask for advice on your career or education. All of the advice that I have to offer can already be found in the following links. Thank you.

    Perspective 101, Concept Art 101, Games Industry info,Oil Paint info, Acrylic Paint info, my sketchbook.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Dubu View Post
    Just for clarity what I'd like to see in this thread is less of the academics of perspective (there is value in that, but most of the people here already have had the acedemics) and more about the application of those academics.
    I know it's your thread and you're talking about what you intended for the thread- but I think it's worth mentioning there's a surprising number of people here who don't understand the fundamentals of perspective very well.

    However, I think you're talking about seeing ways people apply those fundamentals in specific situations, which would be really helpful.

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  12. #12
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    Here's some stuff in the way of examples that I drew with ballpoint during a particularly boring class last weekend (not an art class). Thinking about what Valor had said about examples and about fitting people in, I decided to draw a 1 point with two figures running away from a house that are staggered in distance from the viewer and not running single file like an ascent of man poster. I also decided to include several people flying on some kind of flying jetskis. The house is seen exactly straight on because as soon as you have a corner pointed to you you have entered two point perspective.
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    To do the staggered figures I am using the two vertical line segments of a rectangle in perspective to make them so they are not in single file, and yet their heights will be in relationship.
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    The people on flying jetskis I could visualize as fitting inside of sections of the 3d shape carved out of triangle based perspective shapes. Thus, I have a couple of telescoped triangles and a big telescoped rectangle in my first drawing. I then begin to define out the three dimensional sections the jetskis will fit inside and make the gestural action lines of my ground figures (to help me as I draw everything together and make sure that the farther away things are correctly partially blocked by the nearer things).
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    Once I have gotten that far I can begin trying to focus in on the tapers of the figures and solidify them. As to the house, I reason that the door of it will be somewhat taller than a figure, so I put the door on one of the sides of the rectangle that a running figure is on. That way I can make it be an appropriate size and then decide the size of the rest of the house in relationship to the door.
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    From here my basic shapes and relationships of size and position are established so it is just a process of firming up my lines and rendering out the drawing.
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    All the drawings here are made by putting that first one under a new sheet of paper so I can see where the lines are to go etc., but my scanning software re-cropped a few things for me. I will continue trying to come up with specific examples that I bring up to this point of where the only thing remaining is to actually firm up and render the drawings. It looks like that is the kind of thing people are looking for. Something I had thought of saying this morning is to suggest to people not to think of how far the object or figure is from the viewer, but how far it is from the vanishing point. If you look at how the perspective lines form up, that is what determines how big something seems to be.

    Last edited by arttorney; October 1st, 2007 at 12:31 PM.
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  13. #13
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    I agree with Lord Dubu. i would like to see the application of the fundamentals. How does one incorporate the Cone of Vision? How does one arrive at the finished perspective drawing?

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