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  1. #1
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    Cow Copic attempts

    so i finally bought myself some nice copic markers, but i can't get used to them! I drew this, and I hope somebody can help me with the coloring :3 (I know about the anatomy/line mistakes, i'd rather hear about coloring personally XD)

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  3. #2
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    I'll admit, it's been ages since I've used Copics.
    But I remember the colors being a little more vibrant.

    Mind you, desaturation can be a good thing.
    So I'm giving this advice very carefully, I don't want to scare you off from a love affair with desaturating things. Desaturation can breathe new life into a colored image that appears too cartoonish, or lacking depth. But, that's only when it's used with control.
    What I see here is an overall lack of saturation across the entire image.
    The fact the black of the image isn't sucking my eyeballs into the visual equivalent of a black hole, and Roy G Biv isn't brutally assaulting me with color, makes me think it's not something your doing purposefully.

    If it's not on purpose,
    An overall faded look can be for alot of reasons. (scanner, among them)
    The one that solved my dull image problems back in the day was paper. Make sure to use Marker Paper (nice smooth stuff), rough paper tends to look dull and also has the unfortunate side effect of drinking your ink, making it harder to blend and depleting the ink reserves faster.

    If it is on purpose,
    Begin to consider what your audience will expect from and image versus what your presenting to them. When somebody sees a Rainbow, for instance, they expect Vibrant overwhelming color. Because that's how we see it in nature, that's what we expect from Art. If your going to go against people's expectations, have a good reason.


    On the topic of Blending,
    Look into a Blender.
    At first it's a little awkward to work with, but it allows you to produce graduated tones. I think that's what you were trying for in the background of the second pic.

    Incidentally, If your on-the-cheap, you can nab some Rubbing Alcohol instead. Copic markers are alcohol-based (hence, the godawful reek), so rubbing alcohol can be used for Washes and some less refined Blending. It's also how you clean the stuff up, so it's a win-win purchase.

    Last edited by Zilant; August 23rd, 2007 at 01:50 AM.
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  4. #3
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    I've got a few copics that I use fairly regularly, and the one thing I find really matters is how fast you colour. If you want those nice smooth areas that copics are really good for, take a deep breath and just scribble it in as fast as you possibly can, because the wetter each line of colour is as you put the next one on the smoother they'll blend together. A blender marker does help, but if you overuse it you'll leave desaturated blotches everywhere.

    Be free, young one, colour fast!

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