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  1. #1
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    Noob Question #1,005: Effects of Alcohol/Tupernoid on Sculpey

    Okay...yet another noob question.

    What happens after you brush your sculpey sculpture with alcohol, lighter fluid, tupernoid, or whatever? Will the sculpey revert to its original state after the fluid dries? Or will it be sticky and extremely soft? Can it be reworked after the fluid is brushed on? And how long before it dries enough to be reworked?

    Also, what happens if you brush it on sculpey that's already been baked?

    Thanks in advance...


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  3. #2
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    GOOD questions! I've been wondering the same thing(s).

  4. #3
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    I'm prolly not the one to answer this question. but it's fine for me after a few hours. I wouldnt recommend reworking the clay. but I'm sure it can be done.

  5. #4
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    I use 93% alcohol - and usually waits half an hour/ an hour. Being a beginner I end up reworking areas that have already been smoothed with alcohol - and that seems to work fine.
    Areas smoothed with alcohol seems to be more firm - perhaps because the oil in the sculpey has been dissolved by the alcohol.

  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aseyngel View Post
    Areas smoothed with alcohol seems to be more firm - perhaps because the oil in the sculpey has been dissolved by the alcohol.
    Okay, here's another: I've been working on a sculpt for a while now and it seems the sculpy is getting a little dry. Can I use some of the dilutant to sorta "reactivate" it? Anybody ever tried this?

    Thanks

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimPV View Post
    Okay, here's another: I've been working on a sculpt for a while now and it seems the sculpy is getting a little dry. Can I use some of the dilutant to sorta "reactivate" it? Anybody ever tried this?
    Sort of. I've had pieces where I tried to blend in some new sculpey and found it gritty and not soft enough to blend. I just put a drop of diluent on my finger and then blend the clay, which seems to work. I don't think you can get the diluent down deep enough to help a really severe case, but you can certainly soften the top layer to make it easier to sculpt.

    As for the original question, I find that turpenoid is the ideal thinner - it's not as aggressive as the mineral spirits or alcohol. It does soften up the surface of the clay for a day or two, so if you're going to use it on a part you intend to sculpt again, do it at the end of a sculpting session, and use it sparingly. If you try to sculpt too soon after using it, you might find that it's too soft, and find yourself destroying a lot of hard work.

    I have no idea what happens with either diluent or turpenoid on baked sculpey, although I know that there is a solvent that can be used after baking, I just don't know what it is - Wayne Hansen sells something on his website he claims will work on baked sculpey..

  8. #7
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    ShadowWing,

    From my experience, Turpenoid makes the SS really sticky and gummy - it eventually goes back to normal though. I prefer 99% Isopropyl Alcohol as it seems a bit less agressive and dries out quicker.

    Check out Smellybug's Sculpting Tutorial at the top of this forum, if you haven't already. He pretty much explains it all and then some.....

    Hope that helps. Good Luck!

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by jlamarche View Post
    I don't think you can get the diluent down deep enough to help a really severe case, but you can certainly soften the top layer to make it easier to sculpt.
    Thanks, jlamarche. Between being something of a newbie and not having as much time as I'd like to sculpt, I'm afraid my current project has been a WIP for a while (and will probably remain that way for a while, too ). Though, with the tips I'm picking up from this site I'm finding I am getting faster, which is encouraging. Plus, I just ordered P. Konig's tutorial DVD, so I'm on my way...!

    Thanks, all.

  10. #9
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    Ok...thanks guys. I will give it a try, but will be careful to wait until it dries before I re-work the area. Don't want to muss it up. Sometimes I can be a little impatient.

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