Il'ya Repin
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    Il'ya Repin

    Found this guy from one of those "Painting of the Day" things on google. I knew it would come in handy eventually

    Bio quoted from ARC:
    Russian painter, was born in 1844 at Tschuguev in the department of Charkov, the son of parents in straitened circumstances. He learned the rudiments of art under a painter of saints named [I. M.] Bunakov, for three years gaining his living at this humble craft. In 1863 he obtained a studentship at the Academy of Fine Arts of St Petersburg, where he remained for six years, winning the gold medal and a travelling scholarship which enabled him to visit France and Italy. He returned to Russia after a short absence, and devoted himself exclusively to subjects having strong national characteristics. In 1894 he became professor of historical painting at the St Petersburg Academy. Repin's paintings are powerfully drawn, with not a little imagination and with strong dramatic force and characterization. A brilliant colourist, and a portrait-painter of the first rank, he also became known as a sculptor and etcher of ability. His chief pictures are Procession in the Government of Kiev, Home-coming, The Arrest, Ivan the Terrible's murder of his Son, and, best known of all, The Reply of the Cossacks to Sultan Mahmoud IV. The portraits of the Baroness Varvara Ikskul von Hildenbandt, of Anton Rubinstein and of Count Leo Tolstoy are among his best achievements in this class. The Tretyakov gallery at Moscow contains a very large collection of his work.
    anyways, one thing that struck me about this particular artist is his use of perspective that you can see in a few pieces. The portrait of Nicholas II(Man in the Blue suit) has a massive foyer behind him... and Nikolay Rymsky-Korsakov, the man sitting on the couch with a pipe... Many artists struggle with putting figures on furniture like that without somehow wrapping the limbs around the form of the couch more, but he managed to show the weight of the shoulder with utmost subtlety. I dunno, I just thought it was cool.

    Some of his portraits though seem to have the same composition that you usually see in classical portraiture, which in my opinion gets boring.. although takes nothing away from the technical skill of the painting.

    Check these out:

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    Last edited by Justin.; August 9th, 2007 at 02:30 PM.
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    I think what makes me like the piece with the fellow in the blue suit alot is that beam of sunlight that is heading towards the throne on the floor

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    sve is offline Registered User Level 16 Gladiator: Spartacus' Retiarii
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    Justin, you are hurting my heart just a bit... you are of course entitled to your own conclusion, but I quietly want to counterargument your opinion... Repin was anything but formal or stiff... He was a free spirit and ever changing person in a real life, he loved to learn his entire life. The main feature of his art is truth about depicted, deepness.
    When making a portrait he always tried to sit the person in the most expressive pose, find the position in which person will feel himself natural and relaxed and the most suitable for his personality.


    This portrait of Nikolai Romanov, the last Russian tsar. Repin was invited to paint this portrait and he was very disappointed by the personality of the Romanov. He talked that he saw a dull mediocre army officer, softly speaking, with mild manners, instead of a leader, gestures are not confident, eyes are feminine, mild. In this way he painted the portrait and you can see the exact impression it produced in the comment before mine... Just a guy in blue suit, the last ruler of the once powerful empire. That's not stiff forms, IMO, that's precision and knowing what he wants.


    I can talk about Rymsky-Korsakov's portrait, the composer, famous for the " Flight Of The Bumblebee" and many more of course... he was a very energetic and organized person, ex-naval officer... but I would prefer to leave you to your own impression.
    More of it, Repin is one of most prolific painters of world. Extremely workaholic. His heritage is huge, so many portraits. He painted until his death being 86 year old at the time..

    Last edited by sve; August 9th, 2007 at 02:28 PM.
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    Dear sve,

    I apologize if I offended, none of what I posted was what I was speaking of about boring or stiff. I will post some of what i was talking about earlier;
    When I spoke of 'formulation' I meant the classical bust shot featured in many classical paintings.

    It was precocious of me to say what I did; I only spoke of what I saw from google and the ARC, which isn't very extensive. I should learn by now not to jump to conclusions like that =\

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    sve is offline Registered User Level 16 Gladiator: Spartacus' Retiarii
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    No, no, my heart needs all kinds of experience . I misunderstood you apparently... I just want you to have maximum full information about this person... He was a rare person, I rarely used this world, but he was as close to genius as I can imagine. His brushwork is so alive, powerful, vivid, it really reaches humans nerves on its own. I was lucky to see his work tet-a tet.
    Nicolai Fechin came from Repin, I'm 100% confident in this.

    Last edited by sve; August 9th, 2007 at 02:48 PM.
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    BOOM:



    "Every little step considered one at a time is not terribly daunting" - Ethan Coen

    New books and process DVD available NOW!

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    There are so many amazing Russian painters that are not so well known in the US. People are slowly catching on here though. Other amazing Russian painters to check out: Nicolai Fechin, Ivan Kramskoi, Valentin Serov, Isaac Levitan, Igor Grabar, Gelii Korzhev and many many more....

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    Repin was a god. My favourite realist painter. The painting "Ivan the Terrible" is a true masterpiece. You can't see it on the picture Justin posted above, but just look at the pespective of the carpets on the floor. They add an incredible amount of depth to the painting (http://www.rollins.edu/Foreign_Lang/Russian/repin2.jpg. I had a bigger version of the picture, hope I can find it. Until then:




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    Yeah jabo, that's what I loved too... the carpets, and the way the figure falls on the floor- it's such a rare thing to see something so well done even in classical stuff, and it made the picture so much more real to me.

    And Dave I'm sorry but the first thing I thought of when I saw that pic was this!

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    Sorry for the constant replies, but here's another version of Ivan. Not big, but the compression is good. It's interesting to note that bad image quality on the internet is often found in circles of academics. So if someone with no clue of computers googles this, keep in mind that every time you open and save a JPG-file, the image compression will destroy more color information.



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