Stroke Angles? (feng zhu) Help

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    Stroke Angles? (feng zhu) Help

    I have got some problems with straight lines. If you press shift you only got 45 degree steps. On the other hand if you press the "v" button you cant use the pen pressure to change opacity, and if you press enter the stroke will double.

    i watched the feng zhu movie vol III and wanted to try learning it, but with the options above im quite not happy.

    thanks

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  4. #2
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    Hi Brain3001,

    I feel your frustration. A solution is at hand (although it's a bit of a drag):

    1, Use the pen tool to draw a vector line (straight or complex, it doesn't matter). I prefer to set the line width to something like zero or 0.1 so it can hardly been seen.

    2, Now select your favoured weapon of choice (pencil, pen, brush etc.)

    3, Now, on the tool properties bar, there are three little icons for the type of stroke to use. One that looks like a pen drawing a curly line (which is selected by default) this is the 'Freehand Strokes' mode we all know and love. The second is of a pen drawing straight zigzag lines, this is the 'Straight Line Strokes' mode that you describe when you use the keyboard shortcut of pressing the 'V' key. But the one you're after looks like a pen within an unfinished circle, the 'Align To Path' drawing mode. If you've got a vector line present on the canvas, this icon can now be chosen. Now when you try to draw away from the line nothing will happen, but if you draw 'under' that vector line with your prefered drawing tool, the line will be fully controllable in terms of pen pressure and opacity; unlike the Straight Line Strokes mode.

    I hope that's a cure for your woes.

    CG

    Last edited by Captain Graviton; August 7th, 2007 at 07:23 AM.
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    I wanted to make a second point here too, so I put it in another post in the hope that Corel might take it on board as a suggestion?

    All of the above technique (regarding the drawing of straight lines at least) could easily and simply be improved and streamlined if we amend the function of holding the shift key to draw them a little. By combining this function with the rotate canvas and making the lines RELATIVE to the SCREEN and not relative to the canvas, one could draw any combination of straight line angles quickly and easily and not be limited to just combinations of 45 degree angles.

    So, I hold down shift and draw a verticle, a horizontal and a 45 degree diagonal line in a drawing I'm creating. THEN I rotate the canvas a bit (we all do this a lot) by using the space + alt key, then I draw the same lines in relation to my SCREEN, but in relation to the CANVAS they have had the same rotation value added and therefore I am unlimited in the array of nice straight controlled lines I can draw.

    Also:

    I often will 'record a stroke', -- you know, click the little menu on the Brush Selector Bar and choose Record Stroke, then draw a little shape, an 'S' or something, and then go about peppering my drawing with that pre-recorded stroke -- What would be cool is if that function also could be made relative to the screen and not the canvas so that my little recorded S-shapes will acknowledge the rotations made.

    Neat idea? I think so, somebody tell someone.

    CG

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    thank you for the vector line answer, i can start working now. (also if there seems too be an other possibility, like in the video)

    i even thought about the rotation technique you described.
    this would really be great.

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    unfortunately i had to notice that working with vector lines is just not intuitive enogh to really paint this way... and im still frustrated.

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    Brain3001,

    I'll add a little to the very good instructions you were given for using the Align to Path feature by Captain Graviton:

    Let's assume you've just opened a new Canvas.

    1. When you draw your first line using the Pen, a Shape is created and appears in the Layers palette named Shape 1.
    2. When you choose a brush variant, then paint following the Shape's path, the brush stroke appears on a new Layer named Layer 1.
    3. If you then draw another line using the Pen tool, another Shape appears in the Layers palette named Shape 2.
    4. Now if you want to paint another brush stroke that follows the Shape 2 path, Shape 2 must be highlighted in the Layers palette. Then the brush stroke appears above Shape 2 on a new Layer named Layer 2.


    Shapes Preferences:

    In Preferences > Shapes, in the lower right corner of the dialog box, you can set the Tolerance level (number of pixels within which Painter will allow you to have your brush stroke applied to the Shape's path). Adjust that number until you have the appropriate Tolerance that works best for you.


    Options Available:

    The only other option, not already mentioned, for painting straight lines while making the brush strokes expressive is practice and more practice painting them freehand.

    It can be done, with enough practice, especially in combination with using the Rotate Page tool to rotate the entire image to an angle that allows you to most comfortably paint a straight line freehand.


    Jin

    Please do not PM me with Painter questions. Instead, post them here where everyone can benefit from them. Thanks!

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    Oh yeah, that as well. Thanks Jin

    It's been a while since i watched those Feng Shu Gnomon DVD's but I think that actually Jin might be right in that those lovely straight lines are made freehand? Often you'll see the line go in, be deleted, go in again, delete out, in, out, in out, do the okey cokey until it's just right. That's a good sign it's done freehand.

    Lastly, one extra idea: Use an actual ruler on your drawing tablet. Takes practice, but there ya go!

    CG

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    ok, thank you guys... im going to use a ruler. freehand without a ruler, would give me too many crappy pictures and would use so much time...

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    In one of Feng's tutorials he shows an exercise for developing freehand straight-line ability... I'm paraphrasing him here, but what he does is draw two dots then quickly draw a line connecting them... as he gets more accurate connecting two-dot pairs, he gradually increases the space between the dots. I've used this exercise and it seems to have improved my straight freehand strokes tremendously.

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  13. #10
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    I also saw Feng's dvds of him doing straight lines at an angle using painter. I guess it's just practice.

    Thanks for the help!

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    drawing straight lines freehand is quite easy with a little practice. the main point is do not look at where your cursor is you look at the point where the line is going to end, while your drawing the line. you keep the cursor in your peripheral vision. they are drawn with an arm motion not wrist. once you get used to it, it is way faster than a ruler or line tool and almost as accurate.

    edit: also the speed you move your arm is critical. too slow and there will be wobble, too fast and you will miss your target. you should move your arm at a comfortable pace somewhere inbetween the two. it should feel smooth and natural.

    Last edited by rattsang; September 4th, 2008 at 05:39 AM.
    its time to knuckle down and really lick boot!
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