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  1. #1
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    Tips on Hair?

    Well, this piece is pretty much finished right now. What I'm looking for are critiques on the hair. It's really bad, I know. I'm planning on going back in and fixing it up but I'm not fuly sure what to do to make it look any better. I'm really not that good with drawing hair of any kind.

    I know that with the green background the shading really shouldn't be purple but I was an idiot at the time that used purple (the same shade even) for shading everything. I'm pretty happy with how the shading looks so I probably won't change that even though it is technically "wrong."

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    The type of art you are doing is formulaic. That is, you’ve learned to draw a particular abstraction of an ear by looking at similar abstractions of legs drawn by other people. And, I assume, you are now looking for an improved formula for drawing hair. But if you have any serious ambitions with your art, then you need to get away from the formulas, and instead, get to the source. Get a mirror and spend some time drawing your own hair. Or get someone to sit for you. Or find some other object that you can draw from observation, such as a wig.

    I think you are awesome, and I wish you the best in your endeavors, but I am tired of repeating myself, I am very busy with my new baby, and I am no longer a regular participant here, so please do not contact me to ask for advice on your career or education. All of the advice that I have to offer can already be found in the following links. Thank you.

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    Actually, I uesd to do that. You know, only learn from referencing other peoples' artwork. Recently, however (well.... around the beginning of the year), I've been focusing upon learning from photographs and muscle structures, etc. It's been going pretty well in terms of muscle but there are some things that still confuse me (like hair). I don't know, it just seems that everytime I try to draw hair from observation I either:
    A) end up with a poor outline of the hair
    B) end up with a junky mess of scribbles.

    So, what do you think? I usually draw from photographs because real-life observation tends to scare me (due to movement).

    Sorry it took me so long to reply, I haven't had the chance to go on the computer that much for the past week-ish it seems. Parents are about to kick me off as I type.

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    Real life observation is important partially *because* of the movement you're afraid of. It's learning to quickly throw down important shapes knowing that the subject matter can change which will define a piece of artwork. The hair in this isn't terrible for the typical "manga" style, perhaps try moving away from that though (frankly it's been done to death and is rather boring). As Seedling rightly said, use yourself as a model - play with different light sources to see how the light plays off your hair, and most importantly - get out there and draw people in the street!

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    Drawing hair from life can be triacky at first. Focus on the hairs and you get a scribbly mess, focus on the outline and it doesn't look realistic.

    Try looking at the forms created through the lights and darks. Don't do every strand, but also don't just do the outline. Start by blocking in larger shapes of shades and shade them progressively darker. Add a single strand here or there. It takes practice for sure, but given enough time it'll start to get easier.

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    I've heard that before, actually. Drawing from real life helps to better your knowledge of the overall shapes and really helps to keep from just obsessing over details (like I seem to). It also gives you the chance to see how your subject manner behaves "naturally."

    I currently am trying to move away from "manga" at all costs. It just seems that my artwork seems to keep retracting to it. (maybe I should stop taking trades with people who have "manga-styled" characters, eh? lol)

    Would you recommend possibly starting out with a less "active" subject manner when drawing from real life? Namely, plants/trees/inanimate objects/etc. I seem to have a poor ability to draw quickly. :/

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    Pash, it sounds like you already know what you should be doing. So, do it!
    (Consider this your virtual kick in the pants.)


    Tristan Elwell
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    Quote Originally Posted by -Pash- View Post
    Would you recommend possibly starting out with a less "active" subject manner when drawing from real life? Namely, plants/trees/inanimate objects/etc. I seem to have a poor ability to draw quickly. :/
    Start climbing the cliff wherever you can get a foothold. And listen to Elwell.

    I think you are awesome, and I wish you the best in your endeavors, but I am tired of repeating myself, I am very busy with my new baby, and I am no longer a regular participant here, so please do not contact me to ask for advice on your career or education. All of the advice that I have to offer can already be found in the following links. Thank you.

    Perspective 101, Concept Art 101, Games Industry info,Oil Paint info, Acrylic Paint info, my sketchbook.
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    Wow, I didn't even consider that when practicing hair. XD
    Thanks so much for the explanation, Rhineville.
    Now that you mention it though, it does make sense. It really is the overall hair clump that should be focused on and the values found throughout. My drawing's hair looks so much flatter now. lol

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