FAKE Colorblindness
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Thread: FAKE Colorblindness

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    FAKE Colorblindness

    This is something that I bet you have all come across which I think is extremely funny. There are people out there who are perfectly healthy, who crave attention enough to tell you that they are colorblind. I have heard of so many people who will tell me with absolute conviction that so and so is colorblind: they can only see in black and white. As a person who is actually colorblind, I can tell you that colorblindness is a misnomer for the actual affliction, because colors aren't the difficulty. It is a difficulty in distinguishing between colors that have the same tone, which for me is all the darker shades of cool colors. While this difficult is a source of amusement for my wife when I try to pickout matching clothes, it is not that big of a deal to be an artist and be colorblind, it just takes a little more work than usual, if you decide to go into the area of difficulty at all.
    However, I wanted everyone to know how to spot a fake, just in case it might be a source of amusement for you as well.

    Is anyone else in here really colorblind? If so does it cause you trouble with your art?


    *Another thing people dont always know: You can turn left on red on a one way street. Its true, I emailed the dept of public safety.

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    Yes I've been tested as color defecient. The typical Red/Green. Like you it mainly has to do with tone. It's odd though. The main problem I've had is that my color choices for skin if I dont have a label would turn out more green. I only find this out after actually asking somebody. It can be quite annoying since I dont know if I can trust my judgement of the color of something, say such as materials as cork board or certain cars that are dark red or green. My doctor said total coloblindness is highly unlikely in a person and is very rare. It is usually associated with another disability or defect.

    Ofcourse I reallly don't like admiting it or telling anyone even new instructors. If they see something wrong, and even look at me as stupid I always avoid telling them because I dont want them to treat me any different from any other artist. What i found out though is I just have to observe more, and study the color wheel and pallete on the computer to help me. Even more so than a normal student. Sometimes I'll just let loose and choose the colors as I see fit so i dont go insane double thinking everything all the time.

    Here's a good website for anyone curious about colorblindness and is fortunate enough to have good vision.

    http://www.vischeck.com/examples/

    One thing you will realise is people with my slight disability favor neon like colors. I always like hues that stand out such as blue.

    Last edited by Costau D; July 20th, 2007 at 02:30 PM.
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    Now I want to know what the deuteranopia pictures look like to a person with tritanopia and vise-versa...

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    I'm not colourblind, but I know someone who has problems with blue and purple (and there was some other colour that came up) of around the same warmth (at least I think it's warmth, I dunno the proper word).

    He's colourblind with other colours too (I just mentioned blue and purple as examples as I don't know his type), but as you said with tone, they need to be similar in some way first (warmth, vividness or something) and definitely in a situation where they can be confused.

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    Now I want to know what the deuteranopia pictures look like to a person with tritanopia and vise-versa...
    Color blindness simulator to the rescue!

    Now you can seeh what any given picture looks like with different forms of color blindness!

    http://www.etre.com/tools/colourblindsimulator/

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    its possible to be completely colorblind. meaning not able to see any colors, just tones. unlike other types of colorblindness (red green and so on) the eyes are capable of seeing color, but their brain isnt capable of registering color, making them see in only tones.

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    I'm partly colourblind- I didn't even notice that my missus had died her hair a shade of bright red 6 months previously.
    It's a very real and occasionally funny phenomenon.
    Normally I just see something a tad off hue, but certain frequencies I can't see or differentiate at all.

    We can't match what we see in paint anyway, only interpret it so I don't stress over it too much..

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spiral fish View Post
    Color blindness simulator to the rescue!
    Holy crap! I can finally see the world through my dad's eyes! Thanks!

    Here's a bit of trivia for you. If I'm remembering correctly, the gene for standard red-green color-blindness is on the X chromosome. That means if you are female and your father has the standard red-green colorblindness, your male children will have a 50% chance of inheriting the gene and being red-green colorblind. Your female children will not inherit the gene. If you are male and your father has red-green color-blindness, you shouldn't be color-blind and neither will your offspring.

    For a female to have the standard red-green color-blindness, she would have to have inherited the gene from both parents, because it is recessive.


    [edit] lol! The website says "The image you uploaded is 98 KB in size. Please reduce the filesize to 100 KB or smaller and try again."

    Last edited by Seedling; July 20th, 2007 at 05:33 PM.
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    For a female to have the standard red-green color-blindness, she would have to have inherited the gene from both parents, because it is recessive.
    Yeah, it's just like hemophilia, this is a sex linked trait, the females are carriers.

    Your female children will not inherit the gene.
    Yes, they do..

    But since in any given cell only one X chromosome is expressed, the other is turned into a barr body and the information is effectively boxed away as heterochromatin.

    So YES, they Do inherit the gene, it just remains unexpressed, and the female with the gene becomes the carrier for the next generation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spiral fish View Post
    So YES, they Do inherit the gene, it just remains unexpressed, and the female with the gene becomes the carrier for the next generation.
    Whups, silly me! I was in a rush to get ice-cream cake when I wrote that. :-)

    50% chance of female offspring enhereting the gene, that's what I shoulda wrote.

    I think you are awesome, and I wish you the best in your endeavors, but I am tired of repeating myself, I am very busy with my new baby, and I am no longer a regular participant here, so please do not contact me to ask for advice on your career or education. All of the advice that I have to offer can already be found in the following links. Thank you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spiral fish View Post
    Color blindness simulator to the rescue!

    Now you can seeh what any given picture looks like with different forms of color blindness!

    http://www.etre.com/tools/colourblindsimulator/
    Or,
    Open any image in Photoshop, convert to Lab mode, and hide the a channel (for protanopia and deuterinopia) or the b channel (for tritanopia).


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    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    Or,
    Open any image in Photoshop, convert to Lab mode, and hide the a channel (for protanopia and deuterinopia) or the b channel (for tritanopia).
    I was never sure if it was as simple as that, given my dad's very strange answers to questions I've asked him about what he sees.

    I think you are awesome, and I wish you the best in your endeavors, but I am tired of repeating myself, I am very busy with my new baby, and I am no longer a regular participant here, so please do not contact me to ask for advice on your career or education. All of the advice that I have to offer can already be found in the following links. Thank you.

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    Perhaps not, but that's what those web simulators are doing.


    Tristan Elwell
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    "Perhaps not, but that's what those web simulators are doing."

    So that's how it works... I always wondered who those things were calculated..

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    It may actually be that simple. I'm guessing the makers of the website have more of a clue than I do. :-)

    I think you are awesome, and I wish you the best in your endeavors, but I am tired of repeating myself, I am very busy with my new baby, and I am no longer a regular participant here, so please do not contact me to ask for advice on your career or education. All of the advice that I have to offer can already be found in the following links. Thank you.

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    I may be red green but it isnt black and white like that. I can see red and green, it's just tones compaired to each other I wouldnt be able to tell the difference. Since red is in purple I can see blue fine but cant always tell the difference between blue and purple because of the red in it. It all depends. It is very hard to explain to people. Finding out if a friend is color blind though by pointing out colors and asking them what color it is is not going to do it.

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    When I was in 3rd grade, I was diagnosed with being colorblind. At the time the doctor told me I had the most severe case of colorblindness. Going through life I know there are many colors I confuse, but it always makes me think "What if the doctor misdiagnosed me just alittle?". I can tell you what certain colors are because I've learned them to be a certain way. I get yellows/greens, blues/purples, red/browns and even some black/blues mixed up. I was told that I only see in grayscale, but the problem I have at the moment with all of it is, I have no way of telling if i was misdiagnosed unless I go back for a test. I've always seen this way, so I have nothing to compare it to. I got the nickname Grayscale in college because of my colorblindness and man..my colorwheel in art class was a sight to behold It hasn't stopped me in my life though. I usually wear black shirts and khaki shorts or jeans. EASY stuff. I'm a 3d animator who dabbles in 2d art sometimes, but I know I would need help with some of my color work.

    There may be people out there at are as you say looking for attention, but then there are some of us that hell... we might be misdiagnosed to some degree. I don't try and use my colorblindness as an excuse for anything. If i screw up a color in my artwork someone will ask what i was thinking...and of course I have say.. "oh..thats not yellow? dammit" And then move on.

    Heh. I actually had a company when I was doing Motion Graphics use my colorblindness as a reason to fire me. Which just makes me laugh considering everything I ever did there shipped with the exact colors I did them in. Nothing was changed. Ah... gotta love some corporate companies.

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    Hmm i guess i'm just a little colourblind, there's a certain shade of brown and purple that's a real mystery to me.. if both are next to each other i can't tell which is which, when there's only one i can't be sure if it's brown of purple.

    But since i'm not an illustrator and most browns and purples are allright, it doesn't bother me at all.

    Why anyone would fake colourblindness is beyond me.. it's not something positive is it? Oo

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    Achromatopsia is the inability to see all colors. This is so rare as to be practically impossible.

    Last edited by brianhamner; July 25th, 2007 at 03:20 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by RyanW View Post
    When I was in 3rd grade, I was diagnosed with being colorblind. At the time the doctor told me I had the most severe case of colorblindness. Going through life I know there are many colors I confuse, but it always makes me think "What if the doctor misdiagnosed me just alittle?". I can tell you what certain colors are because I've learned them to be a certain way. I get yellows/greens, blues/purples, red/browns and even some black/blues mixed up. I was told that I only see in grayscale, but the problem I have at the moment with all of it is, I have no way of telling if i was misdiagnosed unless I go back for a test. I've always seen this way, so I have nothing to compare it to. I got the nickname Grayscale in college because of my colorblindness and man..my colorwheel in art class was a sight to behold It hasn't stopped me in my life though. I usually wear black shirts and khaki shorts or jeans. EASY stuff. I'm a 3d animator who dabbles in 2d art sometimes, but I know I would need help with some of my color work.

    There may be people out there at are as you say looking for attention, but then there are some of us that hell... we might be misdiagnosed to some degree. I don't try and use my colorblindness as an excuse for anything. If i screw up a color in my artwork someone will ask what i was thinking...and of course I have say.. "oh..thats not yellow? dammit" And then move on.
    Consider yourself lucky, until 12th grade I thought I had just never learned colors. When I went in for the color test (after my art teacher saw my colour wheel) they put me through almost two hours (or at least that's what it felt like) of "magic eye" tests. Seriously, they were just asking "what shape do you see?" over and over and over and over. If I didn't see anything, they said "just guess". How can anybody possibly guess a shape that just isn't there! It was quite infuriating.

    Anyway, it doesn't affect me too harshly. I have a few friends that I can send my art to, which they normally say something like "why does the ground look pink?" to which I reply "no, that's brown... drat". It's common, but only takes 5 minutes out of every piece I do, and gives me a good excuse to get crits.

    Quote Originally Posted by brianhamner View Post
    Achromatopsia is the inability to see all colors. This is so rare as to be practically impossible.
    I believe it isn't hereditary, but is actually caused by brain damage. I don't have the time right now to research it, but I remember looking into it in the past.

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    on a slightly different note i remmber there being a program on the BBC quite a while ago that was all about discovering how some people see differently after various injuries/traumas heck some where born into there gifts.

    1 person after a crash could no longer see faces, im serous, he got showed alot of images of really famous people and his family and he couldnt recognise them. But as soon as he worked it out with clues he wouldnt believe that he just saw their image. unbelievable is the brain and i consider every1 has a gift.

    there where so many wierd injuries that caused truly wonderfull benefits, for instance a blind man, blind ever since he was born could actually see musical notes with colour. he was tested and he was as correct as a computer at picking up notes.

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    If you are interested in stories about the fascinating ways that the human brain can go awry, there’s a book you would like: The Man Who Mistook his Wife for a Hat.

    It’s written by a neurologist, and the chapters are stories about his most interesting patients over the years.

    Ooh, Amazon informs me that he has also written a book on colorblindness.

    Here’s a blurb from Amazon:

    “Neurologist Sacks, famed for his investigations of unusual medical conditions (The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, etc.), went to Micronesia in 1993 to study firsthand two rare disorders: achromatopsia, or total congenital color blindness, which afflicts more than 5% of the population on the islands of Pingelap and Pohnpei; and lytico-bodig, a fatal, progressive neurodegenerative disease common in Guam, causing paralysis, dementia and catatonia. His total immersion in island life makes this luminous, beautifully written report a wondrous voyage of discovery. Most of those born color-blind never learn to read because they can't see the teacher's writing on the board; they can't work outdoors in bright light, and are unable to see fine detail; yet many achromatopes, Sacks found, develop acute compensatory memory skills and curiosity and thus live in a world of heightened reality.”

    I think you are awesome, and I wish you the best in your endeavors, but I am tired of repeating myself, I am very busy with my new baby, and I am no longer a regular participant here, so please do not contact me to ask for advice on your career or education. All of the advice that I have to offer can already be found in the following links. Thank you.

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    The remedies that work for me are to have a working knowledge of the subject, to make 'educated guesses' at color, or to simply ask someone. If working digitally, color picking is easy, and when I need to, I utilize Steel Dolphin's Color Scheme Tool.

    The US Army (I'm in the Reserve) has told me that I'm color-blind, but a more PC term would be 'color deficient'. Color blindness seems to imply monochromatic vision, which is incredibly rare. Its a strange thing to have, although I don't know how strange since I can't really compare my vision to anything 'normal'.

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