Art: head studies / portraits
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    head studies / portraits

    Here are some head studies from life, web, and reference. I think the lower right pic is a Fritz Willis study. C&C are always welcome. I need to finish that top right picture. I hope this isn't a heavy DL.




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    Its good to see you have some studies going chris. Keep on doing these while your not in classes at the moment. You gotta keep you hand in it. Now i have a few critiques. On the first head, his eyes look to close together, remember roughly one eye distance in between the eyes. I know the shadows in the sockets are deep, but visually they still look close. And the beard on him doesn't look like a beard, it looks too pasted on. The nose looks pretty good, but it would be nice to see some straights in there. I like how you lost the top part of the turban, but the drapery in it has too many lines running through it. Over all what i think your big problem is, is creating more shapes and better shapes. That kinda thing comes with time and practice. Also look at other people who make really good designed shapes. Rockwell and leyendecker would be a good place to start. On the second head, its more of the same as in the first. The beard looks pasted on alot more. Remember to draw through and actually construct a jaw first and then put the beard on. Also I think with the eyes, on all of the drawings for that matter look a little generic. I think because you've studied the loomis and vanderpoel stuff before your drawing those features generically. Also i think that your consciously thinking about drawing and eye, rather than drawing the right shapes. In portraits and in figures its hard to overlook anatomy and stuff, but when you think of anatomy instead just simple shapes you just make it harder on yourself. Think shape first. Thinking in shapes will also help you get a better type. Thats about it man. I hope this helps. I hope it doesn't sound like i'm just grilling you relentlessly. Its great that your doing stuff while your not in class. This would be the same stuff you would hear if you were though. Keep it up, its really good to see that your getting some time in while dealing with everything else in your life right now. Post anymore new studies you do. Hope to see you next semester. Take care.

    mark

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    Don't worry Mark, the grilling is great, I appreciate it. Very good points to ponder over. Thanks for the crits. I like the points about the eyes, they do seem generic. Back to the drawing board. I will definitely see you next semester. How's the crew at Watts? Anything interesting happening?

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    nothing new really. Same ol stuff. All of us are just working hard, studying like crazy. I'm actually gonna do another BIG painting as soon as the semester is over hopefully. Ron has been doing so many cool demos lately as hes been helping me out a great deal. Jeffs been doing alot of freelance, and erik is getting pieces ready so he can start to do the same. Thats about it though

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    Chris, ok, now I know who cityworker is. Damn, now I have to figure out who panda...doh, I cant remember now. Its a good name.

    All of these are well executed, but have a certain stiffness to the shapes created. The reason; first time finding them, exaggerated them as a result. It is easy to see one thing and see its unique properties all to itself. But, the minute we look at it again with more than it in focus, they calm down. The characteristics of that shape that is. All of these have strength in their character, in their likeness, in their execution. They lack strength in taking them all the way to a strong finish. Just more mileage is going to aid you in this. Mileage, and someone to show you the right direction. That is why you posted I would hope, that and a pat on the back for doing such a dman good job...:chug:

    Anyway, look at the shapes first, then take it back a step and and look at the shapes related to the other shapes; this will bring you three things:

    1. correct proportions in relationship to the other features and shapes, etc...

    2. correct placement in relationship to the other objects...

    3. greater strength in unity of shapes as a whole, and common angularity of all shapes.

    This last one means, look at all the parallels in the face, or try to find them. There are a lot more than you think, or see at first, and when you tap into that, you will strengthen the drawing with more common directional flow, from the light, and from the shadows, which are all derived by the light, and the forms the light are hitting; anatomy of the subject or surface planes of teh subject-both one in the same, but talked about independently by so many differing points of view in the art world. Its the old impressionist or realist issue, sargent was both, on in the same. Two sides of thinking, same conclusion...what a bunch of boobs artists can be sometimes. Egos...doh.

    Hope that helps a bit...

    Ron

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    great art great crits

    cityworker - these are great images - I can't add much that these folks haven't already hit on, and you're far better than me, so kudos! The only other trick that I've used to help me in my portraits is to work on medium tone paper so I am forced to note shadows AND highlights, as wall as variations on the middle tones. It helped me realize just how much definition those high white spots add to the realism of the image (such as on the wet edge of the lower eyelid, or the edge of the skin above one's upper lip, in standard lighting situations). What I still cannot do effectively is avoid taking the things I've learned in one portrait and just doing them exactly the same way on every other portrait. I don't see the shapes yet, but I'm trying!

    I just want to say that one thing I am loving about this site (especially this forum) is how good the critiques are. You folks know your sh!t, and you aren't stingy with it. You're generous and you take the time to critique and share and guide, and that makes those of us who need the help very very lucky.

    Thanks for sharing, and thanks for critting!!

    maldrin

    d a v i d p i n e

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    Ron - thanks for the pointers. I will definitely use them on my next head studies, I will post the results. I can't wait to get back in class. Its great to see you, Erik, and Mark posting. Keep it coming, please. See you in the fall session.

    Maldrin - thanks alot. That sounds like a good trick, I see other people's work on toned paper, and I think I'm going to try it.

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