Tips for non-paying jobs
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Thread: Tips for non-paying jobs

  1. #1
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    Tips for non-paying jobs

    Here are a few tips to help you find team mates or free help for your project.

    I know not all MOD projects and not every starting game developper or Comic writer have a web site, but if you DO have a website, post the link in your add.

    It doesn't have to be fancy, but if you have been serious about your project (especially if you have a larger MOD team) your website should reflect that.

    It's often easier to post a link to your website then post a 8 pages brief about your project on the forums, and it's usually easier to read for the artist because your website should have proper formatting.

    I have in the past answered unpaid job ads because the person's website and half finished product was particularly clean and I was impressed.
    --------------------------------
    Also the non-paying section is not a charity. Most artists here are hoping to make a living of their art someday if they don't do already. The non-paying section is a way for artists who are not quite ready to make the professional jump to team up with projects that will give them exposure and experience.

    Exemple: 2 programmers want to make an indie game, they need an artist but can't afford to pay, if they look serious someone who wants to break into the game industry might wanna team up with them. Why? Because their art will be backed up by a program and the result will be a game, because they will learn how art integrates with programming and what the constraints are. Because Together they can put up a nice website and attract attention to themselves in the indie game scene.

    Exemple number 2: A band needs a cover for their new album but can't afford to pay. On the other hand, they will give the artist a handful of cd's and posters with their art and can garantee that x people will see the covers with the artist credited and that the posters will be seen on stage at each concert. It gives the artist exposure.

    Now it's time to ask yourself, what can you give to the artist who will put precious hours on a drawing for you? Of course it's a piece they can put in their portfolio, but they can get portfolio pieces by doing personal work of their own, they don't need you for that.

    I hope we don't come off as rude, but we are NOT a charity.

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  3. #2
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    This is a report from an entry in my blog:

    10 tips to attract team members

    So you have a great idea for a game. Or maybe you don’t but you’d like to work on one anyways. How do you recruit team mates? When should you recruit them? Well, there are many variables to consider:

    1) A lot of game lovers think they have the best game idea ever, they won’t be won over that easily to work on yours. If you don’t have an idea you really really want to work on, or if you have little experience, consider joining someone else’s team.

    2) Choose a reasonable goal. If you have extravagant and unrealistic goals, it will turn off all potential team mates who have enough experience to know it’s unrealistic, you will end up with team mates with as little experience as you do.

    3) It’s easier to convince someone to work for free if they see that you are working as hard (if not harder) than them. You have to do something valuable in the team, be it programming, art, audio. Game design, unless you have a lot of experience in it, isn’t valuable to the team. Planning, having a vision, doing the website, are not usually considered like really valuable to the team, because you are not going to do a sizable portion of the work. You may join a team and do these, but don’t expect programmers and artist to join your team based on your having a vision of a great game and the website to go with it. To lead a project, you have to pull your own weight.

    4)It’s easier to convince someone to work for free if they are getting something out of it (experience with how games are built, a working demo to put in their portfolio etc.) If you have skills they don’t have, you can team up for great portfolio building projects, or you can even barter. Trade art for code (exemple, you can code the php back end of the artist’s gallery in exchange for some models.)

    5)Your team mates have ideas about gameplay and design too and they appreciate that their input be considered (which is harder if they come in at the very end.) They can also spot problems you wouldn’t have seen (acting as a second pair of eyes.)

    6)If they do this for free, they are not going to do it full time, giving them time to work is essential. Depending on the scope of your game, it can range from a few weeks to several months.

    7) Search teammates where they are, go to sound forums to search audio artists, go to places like ConceptArt to find 2D artists. If you post on a forum and don’t get an answer, don’t get disapointed and DON’T BEG. Keep posting progress shots of your project and someone will take notice. Don’t get agressive if people suggest you should pay for the work. Present what the potential team mate would get out of the deal.

    8 ) Offering a share of the revenue is a huge gamble for your potential team mates, unless you have a great track record, they have no way to know how much money they will get out of their work, or if they will get any money at all. Revenue sharing is often the same as working for free so don't get worked up if it doesn’t attract too much attention.

    9) Don’t go nuts with the NDA’s. Ideas are a dime a dozen, if you present a lot of clear and well formated information, it will be easier to show that you are organized, realistic and hard working. Don’t overwhelm your potential team mates with 2 pages of narratives about the backstory in the body of the forum ad. Bullet point lists with features and key informations, compensation, teams structeur, aim for the revenue model of the game, your contact info and URL. That’s about enough.

    10) Don’t take the first teammate who replies out of fear that no one else replies. Take time to chat with the person, see what their level of skill is, if you have the same goals, if you get along. Maybe do a sample tiny project before jumping into something bigger.

    So, you are the one who decides when and how to recruit, considering all the variables, because you know your own project. Be ready to coach your team mates them in how your art, code or audio assets should be formated. Be ready for comments about gameplay and design.

    Starting to search early shouldn’t hurt since then you would have less pressure to find the right person right away.

    I hope this works.

    If you have any questions about this or other topics, feel free to ask!

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    Be realistic!
    Here is an article about starting a game company. It was written by one of the guys behind GarageGames, that's not bad credentials at all.

    http://makeitbigingames.com/2006/06/...pment-company/

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    Comic Book

    Hi Quitsune,

    Basically, I'm hoping to break into the comic book industry one day. Obviously, I'm aware that the comic book industry and superhero genre in particular is a very competitive and niche market, where little money is generated in the sales of comics outside of the two publishing giants, Marvel and DC Comics. But I have the determination to see my comic book series published (via independant publisher or self-publish or something else) and also gain valuable experience, exposure and published work to show to potential employers. Also, to receive potential royalties from - for both the artist and I, however little.

    Two years ago, I came up with a superhero comic series concept and started writing the scripts for it and finished 5 issues worth of comic scripts in three months. However, I didn't have the funds to pay for a freelance artist to draw them (I'm a college student and a part-time worker). A friend of mine told me about this website and told me to post a thread about my comic in the "Non-Paying Job Listings" section and maybe look out for an aspiring artist who is also looking to break into the comic book industry as well.


    I have no prior experience in comics whatsoever, just comic scripts typed and saved on my computer, waiting to be drawn. But does that matter? Do I have to have had some experience in comics before to put a job listing on this section?

    I am asking this because I read your post on this thread about the "Non-Paying Job Listings" not being a charity and a way for young, aspiring artists to gain exposure and published work that can be shown to potential employers. I am posting this to ask you - if it is OK that I post about my comic book proposal on this section? Is it realistic enough? (because I'm aware that the artist is doing this work for free to gain exposure and experience so he can progress further in his career). Am I being unfair on the artist or not?
    I don't want to waste an artist's time by posting some thread only for it to be taken down by you or somebody else so I'm asking you.



    Thank you. Look forward to your reply
    Regards,
    Absz.

    Last edited by absz007; July 31st, 2009 at 01:28 AM.
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  8. #5
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    Thanks Quitsune, very good information! I've definitely noticed that being able to show you're working hard and passionate about the project makes all the difference

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